Home Local News Next Tuesday, Jamaican Parish Judge Venice Blackstock Murray, will render a decision on submissions in the case involving beleaguered Director of Public Prosecution, Anthony Armstrong which could determine whether he goes free or will begin the fight to defend himself against multiple charges of fraudulent conversion and conspiracy to commit fraud.

Next Tuesday, Jamaican Parish Judge Venice Blackstock Murray, will render a decision on submissions in the case involving beleaguered Director of Public Prosecution, Anthony Armstrong which could determine whether he goes free or will begin the fight to defend himself against multiple charges of fraudulent conversion and conspiracy to commit fraud.

by Pointe Xpress
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A former client of Armstrong’s has accused him of selling three properties while he was incarcerated in the United States of America between 1999 and 2002.

Hugh Wildman, Armstrong’s attorney, has asked the court to dismiss the case against his client whom he argues is innocent of wrongdoing.

Wildman claims that the complainant’s cousin, Shelly Ann Campbell, who has also been charged, was behind the sale of the disputed properties.

Wildman produced documents which appeared to prove that Campbell signed each of the three property transfers in the name of the complainant and herself.

She was also the joint owner of one of the apartments.

Armstrong, meanwhile, has made the argument in his defence that he is innocent of the charges as the proceeds of the sale were paid over to the complainant’s father who had been authorised to act as his son’s agent during his incarceration.

The complainant has countered this with the claim that Armstrong made payments to him from Antigua and Barbuda in the amount of US$15,450.00 between September 2006 and April 2007.

Armstrong’s lawyer, however, contends that his client was being blackmailed by the complainant who threatened to cause trouble for Armstrong and threaten his reputation and employment in Antigua and Barbuda as DPP with the property scandal.

In 1999, the complainant reported Armstrong to Jamaica’s General Legal Council (GLC).

In February, the GLC’s disciplinary committee found that Armstrong was guilty of professional misconduct for signing a document for a client who was not present.

Armstrong is appealing that decision.

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